Enhancing Language Development in Childhood Online Bundle, 3 Certificate Courses

Learn How to Enhance Language Development in Children

Enhancing Language Development in Childhood Online Bundle, 3 Certificate Courses

NOW ONLY

AU$699

Save AU$1101 (61%)
OFF RRP AU$1800
Get Info Pack

Get Enhancing Language Development in Childhood, Teaching Students With Learning Disabilities and Teaching Students With Autism in this Bundle

1. Enhancing Language Development in Childhood:Learn How to Enhance Language Development in Children

Follow your child's lead and have fun while enhancing language development!

In this fun and user-friendly course for parents, teachers, and caregivers, you will discover how children learn to process language and how they become proficient speakers and thinkers. This Certificate in Enhancing Language Development in Childhood Online Course will help you enrich your child's life by stimulating his or her continued speech, brain, and language development in an enjoyable, age-appropriate, and natural way.

2. Teaching Students With Learning Disabilities:Start Now To Learn How To Teach Students With Learning Disabilities

Learn how to successfully meet the diverse needs of students with disabilities in your classroom from an experienced special educator. We'll dissect the whole special education process, from working with individualized education programs (IEPs) to helping students struggling with reading comprehension, math skills, and writing.

We'll also talk about fun games you can incorporate, tips for modifying your classroom, and lots of tested methods for bringing out the best behavior in your students. Whether you're already in the classroom, studying for the Praxis Special Education exam, or getting ready to work with students in a variety of settings, this course will prepare you to understand and empower your kids with learning disabilities. In this course, you'll discover easy, practical, and creative strategies that will help your struggling students find their light bulb moments!

3. Teaching Students With Autism:Learn How to Teach Children with Autism

Develop the skills to counter these students' social awkwardness, sensory sensitivities, meltdowns, problems with homework completion, language reciprocity issues, and violent fixations with this Certificate in Teaching Students With Autism Online Course. Even if you don't have a student with high-functioning autism or Asperger's Syndrome in your class this year, these strategies will equip you to deal with any student who exhibits these characteristics on a regular basis.

For comprehensive information on units of study click the units of study tab above.

This is an incredible opportunity to invest in yourself and your future, sharpen your training skills and learn what it takes to create your own success with Courses For Success Today!

Course Fast Facts:

  1. This course is delivered 100% on-line and is accessible 24/7 from any computer or smartphone
  2. Instructors lead each course and you will be able to interact with them and ask questions
  3. You can study from home or at work at your own pace in your own time
  4. You can download printer friendly course material or save for viewing off line
  5. You will be awarded a certificate at completion of this course

How to study online course?

Upon enrolment an automated welcome email will be sent to you (please check your junk email inbox if not received as this is an automated email), in order for you to access your online course, which is Available 24/7 on any computer or smart mobile device. New courses start every month to ensure that we have the correct ratio of students to tutors available, please ensure you select a starting date when you go through our shopping cart, at checkout. The course is easy to follow and understand.

Recognition & Accreditation

All students who complete each course receive a certificate of completion per course, with a passing score (for the online assessment) and will be issued a certificate via email.

Enhancing Language Development in Childhood 3 Course Bundle includes the following courses, below is a summary of each course: 

Course 1 - Certificate in Enhancing Language Development in Childhood Online Course

Introduction

How do children learn language? Play! And not with flash cards, or anything else that you can buy. Children are born with a complete package of language-learning tools. The only accessory they need is you, helping them unlock their natural instincts for language. After reading this first section, you'll be using play and instinct to communicate soundlessly with a newborn, to help him fill his language-building toolbox, and to create a stimulating environment for language development. 

First Play: Sounds & Signs

Imagine a database of sounds in your child’s brain. Where do these sounds come from? How does she file, sort, and choose to use these sounds to communicate? In today's lesson, we'll look at why her mind is made for these remarkable tasks, and you'll learn straightforward ways you can lend a hand (even in the form of sign language!). This lesson also includes a fascinating overview of brain and mouth anatomy.

Mama and Other First Real Words

You say, “Shelly just said, ‘ball’!” But your friend says, “Nah, that was just babbling.” Who's right? Does something count as a real word if it isn’t pronounced perfectly? In this lesson, we'll explore what makes a word real and how to interpret your child’s patterns of simplifying early language. You'll also start using a journal to uncover the rich potential in your child’s one- and two-word phrases.

Understanding Before Speaking

Once you understand the mechanics of hearing and understanding, your role in encouraging language can be powerful, simple, and fun! Many caregivers ask at this stage when they should start to worry about language delays. In today's lesson, we'll soothe your concerns by discussing what to watch for, when to seek assistance (and from which type of specialist), and when to stop worrying and keep playing! We'll look through a list of typical first words that you can use to trace your child’s communication explosion.

Watching & Playing

Can you guess when a baby’s brain grows the most? How do you facilitate this growth? Again, the answer is play! In this lesson, we'll match favorite infant-caregiver games to the neurological functions they stimulate. You'll also learn how language affects the development of thinking skills, just as the function of thinking affects language development. Today we'll explore how to keep this circle of growth cycling.

Adding Pieces to Phrases

Your kiddo is talking, but you’re not done yet! Although two-word phrases, such as “get ball” certainly communicate an idea, your child will keep refining his sentences as he grows. Today you'll find out how to help him progress to past tense, contractions, pronouns, and conjunctions. You'll also learn about the fascinating thought processes behind questions. Don’t forget your journal! 

Be A Natural Model

Wow–now we have listening, speaking, sounds, words, and sentences. What more is there? Lots! Is it still fun? Does she still need you? Of course! In today's lesson, we'll continue with a few more do's and don'ts for caregivers, emphasizing our favorite learning tool: games!

Making the Tongue Take Off

Expanding on our earlier anatomy lesson, today you'll learn how sounds depend on strong, agile mouth muscles. Before you start thinking about tongue push-ups, remember we always focus on maximizing the opportunities within natural interactions. A discussion of feeding—including your choices of bottles, cups, and straws—is key. We'll answer complex and controversial questions about pacifiers, sippy cups, and thumb sucking, and I'll provide some great tips for easing necessary transitions.

Playing With Sounds

Some sounds sound fun (like boing!), and some sounds feel fun (like zzzzzz). What does this kind of fun teach if it doesn't use precise words? In today's lesson, you'll find out what you're teaching when you encourage your little one to play with sounds. You'll also learn which speech games will help you make the connection from speech to reading.

Talking More

Now you know that speech, language, and communication are different, but related, topics. Using your knowledge of how sounds make language, in this lesson, you'll learn how language is used to communicate and connect with others. We call this social use of language. Today you'll learn how to help your talker become a conversationalist!

Appreciating Differences

Although children follow similar development processes, no two walk the same path. As more is discovered about learning, the lines between different, delayed, and disability grow foggier. Demystifying these terms is easier when you learn about different learning styles, and when you understand the styles used by you and your child. While you can’t eavesdrop on your child’s thoughts, what you learn in today's lesson will help you help her connect her learning style and her use of language.

A Word About Literature

Teaching a child the alphabet tends to be our first step toward reading, but is it where literacy begins? While this skill can be gratifying for adults to see, literacy begins in the brain and is nurtured with fun and games. As you've learned about language skills, literacy doesn’t come in a box from the store. When you understand instincts and use them in fun and play, they come from you.

Course 2 - Certificate in Teaching Students With Learning Disabilities Online Course

Understanding Learning Disabilities

One in seven Americans has a learning disability. That means that in your class of 28 students, four could have significant trouble keeping up with the basics. In our first lesson, we'll investigate what learning disabilities (LDs) are and define some common types of LDs that you'll see again and again in the classroom. After that, we'll take a few minutes to switch roles with our learners and see what it's like to try to work past an LD.

Identifying Students with LDs

Is Tamara having trouble with reading because it's not her favorite subject, or is something else going on? The process of identifying students with LDs is a long and sometimes tedious one. But with the proper expectations and the right dose of compassion, teachers can have success in the investigatory prereferral process. We'll discuss it in today's lesson.

Making Sense of the IEP

In this lesson, we'll discuss IEPs, which are road maps that guide the learning curve of every child with LDs. Written specifically to address individual needs, these legal documents are both confusing and complicated. But once you know how to decode the language and the sections, it's easy to start using IEPs as the helpful tools they're meant to be.

Understanding Service Locations

Students with LDs  receive IEP-mandated services in a number of ways. Whether they mostly stay in their classroom or spend some time in the special education room, they're going to learn a bit differently than other students. Today, we'll take a look at the common service locations that help students with LDs meet educational goals.

Learning the Right Teaching Strategies

We all remember that one teacher who really made a difference in our lives. The right teaching strategies spell out the difference between a creative, engaging classroom and one that stagnates without reaching most of its students. In this lesson, we'll talk about the teaching strategies that make learning memorable for students with LDs.

Helping Students With Word Identification Problems

Word identification problems can make "cat" look like "can" or "pan." Imagine how hard it would be to read all the wrong words in all the right places. In this lesson, you'll discover smart strategies to help student find their words.

Helping Students With Reading Comprehension Problems

For students who have trouble reading, it's hard enough to just get the words right. But to pair those words with their meaning is a seemingly insurmountable task. In today's lesson, we'll go over how to chunk information so students can understand what they're reading and fall in love with texts.

Helping Students With Written Expression Problems

Writing poses quite a few challenges for students with LDs. Some of them have trouble holding their pencils, and others find it difficult to communicate what it is they're trying to say. Today, we'll take a tour of strategies that bring writing to life for students who often don't even realize all the neat things they have to say.

Helping Students With Math Reasoning and Calculation Problems

A lot of students with LDs dread math because it requires a lot of skills to come together seamlessly and at the same time: Reasoning, logic, number sense, writing, and computation are all key. But math doesn't have to be so scary. In this lesson, we'll discuss how to make all those numbers a little easier for students with LDs to manipulate.

Modifying Your Classroom

Even though the IEP gives you a general idea of how to help your students with LDs , you'll still need to explore new, innovative ideas to modify your classroom, assignments, and tests, and that's what we'll discuss in today's lesson. These modifications often spell success for students with LDs who need just a little push in the right direction.

Managing Student Behavior

We've all had days when going to school was a drag. Students with LDs are no different. Because school forces them to tackle big challenges head on, it's often their least favorite thing to do. This can lead to big behavior problems that you'll have to defuse creatively. We'll take a look at some great strategies in this lesson.

Linking Home and School

The connection between home and school is a powerful predictor of classroom success for students with LDs. So in our final lesson, we'll discuss the best ways to conduct meaningful parent-teacher conferences that help everyone unite behind a child with LDs in need.

Course 3 - Certificate in Teaching Students With Autism Online Course

Meet Your Students With Austism
You may have already taught students with high-functioning autism or Asperger's Syndrome, but have you taken the time to get to know them? Today we'll discover how their brains are wired differently, the ways they behave, and smart strategies to make the most of the opportunity to teach these kids.

Understand the Common Characteristics of HFA/AS
Now that we've met our students, in this lesson we'll develop an understanding of the characteristics they often display in our classrooms. From trouble handling change to difficulty with social interaction, language processing, and distractions, we'll discover how these characteristics shape students' worldview and ability to perform in academic settings. 

Discover How Your Students Think
Did you know that most students with high-functioning autism and Asperger's Syndrome are visual thinkers? Today we'll spend some time determining how these students process information so we can tailor our lesson plans to their preferred learning and thinking styles. 

Nurture Students' Social Skills
In this lesson, you'll discover how students with high-functioning autism and Asperger's Syndrome struggle socially. We'll talk about the extent of the problem, some of the causes, and its very real impact. Then we'll discuss some nonverbal and verbal exercises we can do in class to lessen these students' social anxiety. 

Encourage Language Reciprocity
Today we'll explore how students with high-functioning autism and Asperger's Syndrome converse and why it's so incredibly hard for them to keep conversations going. Then we'll talk about a graphic organizer that is very helpful when students need to translate between their thoughts and ours. Finally, we'll cover how to write social stories that help kids understand what's expected of them.

Work With Sensory Sensitivities
In this lesson, we're going to examine why students with high-functioning autism and Asperger's Syndrome have such delicate sensory sensitivities. Then we'll discuss two strategies for helping them reclaim control over daily experiences that once seemed quite intimidating. Both the strategies we'll discuss are visual ones, and they're wonderfully easy and effective. 

Nurture Special Interests
Students with high-functioning autism or Asperger's Syndrome are often "little professors" who have highly specialized interests and fixations. How do we direct these gifts for math or language or science into appropriate academic channels? With visual strategies that help students link their interests to the broader world. You'll learn the strategies today!

Encourage Homework Completion
This may just be your favorite lesson in the course! Every teacher I know is looking for new and exciting strategies to get students to do their homework. Today you'll learn how to engage students with high-functioning autism or Asperger's Syndrome in their studies and link their interests with meaningful learning. 

Counter Runaway Emotions and Meltdowns
What if you had an emotional meltdown every single day? Would you be excited to get out of bed and do it all over again? Probably not. Many students with high-functioning autism or Asperger's Syndrome are prone to meltdowns and tantrums that derail their focus and take up precious classroom time. In this lesson, you'll learn how to turn these charged encounters into more positive learning experiences. 

Redirect Violent Fixations
No one likes to be teased! Sadly, many students with high-functioning autism or Asperger's Syndrome are bullied or made fun of on a daily basis. Because this makes them so fearful and frustrated, they often fixate on objects of power or violence—fixations that can have very serious consequences in today's world. Today we'll delve into how to channel these frustrations into more appropriate feelings. 

Foster Attentiveness
Imagine what it would be like if your mind raced all the time, darting from thought to thought at warp speed. It would be pretty hard to pay attention to anything, wouldn't it? In this lesson, we'll look at ways to help students focus on our lessons and learn a little something in the process. Here's a hint: Visuals help! 

Plan for the Future
In our final lesson, we'll talk about smart ways to prepare students for life beyond our four walls. It's never too early to start thinking about ways to encourage students to reach their highest potential in future classes, jobs, and social roles. After all, isn't that why we chose to be teachers in the first place?

Entry requirements

Students must have basic literacy and numeracy skills.

Minimum education

Open entry. Previous schooling and academic achievements are not required for entry into this course.

Computer requirements

Students will need access to a computer and the internet. 

Minimum specifications for the computer are:

Windows:

  • Microsoft Windows XP, or later
  • Modern and up to date Browser (Internet Explorer 8 or later, Firefox, Chrome, Safari)

MAC/iOS

  • OSX/iOS 6 or later
  • Modern and up to date Browser (Firefox, Chrome, Safari)

All systems

  • Internet bandwidth of 1Mb or faster
  • Flash player or a browser with HTML5 video capabilities(Currently Internet Explorer 9, Firefox, Chrome, Safari)

Students will also need access the following applications:

Adobe Acrobat Reader

About this Course

Get Enhancing Language Development in Childhood, Teaching Students With Learning Disabilities and Teaching Students With Autism in this Bundle

1. Enhancing Language Development in Childhood:Learn How to Enhance Language Development in Children

Follow your child's lead and have fun while enhancing language development!

In this fun and user-friendly course for parents, teachers, and caregivers, you will discover how children learn to process language and how they become proficient speakers and thinkers. This Certificate in Enhancing Language Development in Childhood Online Course will help you enrich your child's life by stimulating his or her continued speech, brain, and language development in an enjoyable, age-appropriate, and natural way.

2. Teaching Students With Learning Disabilities:Start Now To Learn How To Teach Students With Learning Disabilities

Learn how to successfully meet the diverse needs of students with disabilities in your classroom from an experienced special educator. We'll dissect the whole special education process, from working with individualized education programs (IEPs) to helping students struggling with reading comprehension, math skills, and writing.

We'll also talk about fun games you can incorporate, tips for modifying your classroom, and lots of tested methods for bringing out the best behavior in your students. Whether you're already in the classroom, studying for the Praxis Special Education exam, or getting ready to work with students in a variety of settings, this course will prepare you to understand and empower your kids with learning disabilities. In this course, you'll discover easy, practical, and creative strategies that will help your struggling students find their light bulb moments!

3. Teaching Students With Autism:Learn How to Teach Children with Autism

Develop the skills to counter these students' social awkwardness, sensory sensitivities, meltdowns, problems with homework completion, language reciprocity issues, and violent fixations with this Certificate in Teaching Students With Autism Online Course. Even if you don't have a student with high-functioning autism or Asperger's Syndrome in your class this year, these strategies will equip you to deal with any student who exhibits these characteristics on a regular basis.

For comprehensive information on units of study click the units of study tab above.

This is an incredible opportunity to invest in yourself and your future, sharpen your training skills and learn what it takes to create your own success with Courses For Success Today!

Course Fast Facts:

  1. This course is delivered 100% on-line and is accessible 24/7 from any computer or smartphone
  2. Instructors lead each course and you will be able to interact with them and ask questions
  3. You can study from home or at work at your own pace in your own time
  4. You can download printer friendly course material or save for viewing off line
  5. You will be awarded a certificate at completion of this course

How to study online course?

Upon enrolment an automated welcome email will be sent to you (please check your junk email inbox if not received as this is an automated email), in order for you to access your online course, which is Available 24/7 on any computer or smart mobile device. New courses start every month to ensure that we have the correct ratio of students to tutors available, please ensure you select a starting date when you go through our shopping cart, at checkout. The course is easy to follow and understand.

Recognition & Accreditation

All students who complete each course receive a certificate of completion per course, with a passing score (for the online assessment) and will be issued a certificate via email.

Enhancing Language Development in Childhood 3 Course Bundle includes the following courses, below is a summary of each course: 

Course 1 - Certificate in Enhancing Language Development in Childhood Online Course

Introduction

How do children learn language? Play! And not with flash cards, or anything else that you can buy. Children are born with a complete package of language-learning tools. The only accessory they need is you, helping them unlock their natural instincts for language. After reading this first section, you'll be using play and instinct to communicate soundlessly with a newborn, to help him fill his language-building toolbox, and to create a stimulating environment for language development. 

First Play: Sounds & Signs

Imagine a database of sounds in your child’s brain. Where do these sounds come from? How does she file, sort, and choose to use these sounds to communicate? In today's lesson, we'll look at why her mind is made for these remarkable tasks, and you'll learn straightforward ways you can lend a hand (even in the form of sign language!). This lesson also includes a fascinating overview of brain and mouth anatomy.

Mama and Other First Real Words

You say, “Shelly just said, ‘ball’!” But your friend says, “Nah, that was just babbling.” Who's right? Does something count as a real word if it isn’t pronounced perfectly? In this lesson, we'll explore what makes a word real and how to interpret your child’s patterns of simplifying early language. You'll also start using a journal to uncover the rich potential in your child’s one- and two-word phrases.

Understanding Before Speaking

Once you understand the mechanics of hearing and understanding, your role in encouraging language can be powerful, simple, and fun! Many caregivers ask at this stage when they should start to worry about language delays. In today's lesson, we'll soothe your concerns by discussing what to watch for, when to seek assistance (and from which type of specialist), and when to stop worrying and keep playing! We'll look through a list of typical first words that you can use to trace your child’s communication explosion.

Watching & Playing

Can you guess when a baby’s brain grows the most? How do you facilitate this growth? Again, the answer is play! In this lesson, we'll match favorite infant-caregiver games to the neurological functions they stimulate. You'll also learn how language affects the development of thinking skills, just as the function of thinking affects language development. Today we'll explore how to keep this circle of growth cycling.

Adding Pieces to Phrases

Your kiddo is talking, but you’re not done yet! Although two-word phrases, such as “get ball” certainly communicate an idea, your child will keep refining his sentences as he grows. Today you'll find out how to help him progress to past tense, contractions, pronouns, and conjunctions. You'll also learn about the fascinating thought processes behind questions. Don’t forget your journal! 

Be A Natural Model

Wow–now we have listening, speaking, sounds, words, and sentences. What more is there? Lots! Is it still fun? Does she still need you? Of course! In today's lesson, we'll continue with a few more do's and don'ts for caregivers, emphasizing our favorite learning tool: games!

Making the Tongue Take Off

Expanding on our earlier anatomy lesson, today you'll learn how sounds depend on strong, agile mouth muscles. Before you start thinking about tongue push-ups, remember we always focus on maximizing the opportunities within natural interactions. A discussion of feeding—including your choices of bottles, cups, and straws—is key. We'll answer complex and controversial questions about pacifiers, sippy cups, and thumb sucking, and I'll provide some great tips for easing necessary transitions.

Playing With Sounds

Some sounds sound fun (like boing!), and some sounds feel fun (like zzzzzz). What does this kind of fun teach if it doesn't use precise words? In today's lesson, you'll find out what you're teaching when you encourage your little one to play with sounds. You'll also learn which speech games will help you make the connection from speech to reading.

Talking More

Now you know that speech, language, and communication are different, but related, topics. Using your knowledge of how sounds make language, in this lesson, you'll learn how language is used to communicate and connect with others. We call this social use of language. Today you'll learn how to help your talker become a conversationalist!

Appreciating Differences

Although children follow similar development processes, no two walk the same path. As more is discovered about learning, the lines between different, delayed, and disability grow foggier. Demystifying these terms is easier when you learn about different learning styles, and when you understand the styles used by you and your child. While you can’t eavesdrop on your child’s thoughts, what you learn in today's lesson will help you help her connect her learning style and her use of language.

A Word About Literature

Teaching a child the alphabet tends to be our first step toward reading, but is it where literacy begins? While this skill can be gratifying for adults to see, literacy begins in the brain and is nurtured with fun and games. As you've learned about language skills, literacy doesn’t come in a box from the store. When you understand instincts and use them in fun and play, they come from you.

Course 2 - Certificate in Teaching Students With Learning Disabilities Online Course

Understanding Learning Disabilities

One in seven Americans has a learning disability. That means that in your class of 28 students, four could have significant trouble keeping up with the basics. In our first lesson, we'll investigate what learning disabilities (LDs) are and define some common types of LDs that you'll see again and again in the classroom. After that, we'll take a few minutes to switch roles with our learners and see what it's like to try to work past an LD.

Identifying Students with LDs

Is Tamara having trouble with reading because it's not her favorite subject, or is something else going on? The process of identifying students with LDs is a long and sometimes tedious one. But with the proper expectations and the right dose of compassion, teachers can have success in the investigatory prereferral process. We'll discuss it in today's lesson.

Making Sense of the IEP

In this lesson, we'll discuss IEPs, which are road maps that guide the learning curve of every child with LDs. Written specifically to address individual needs, these legal documents are both confusing and complicated. But once you know how to decode the language and the sections, it's easy to start using IEPs as the helpful tools they're meant to be.

Understanding Service Locations

Students with LDs  receive IEP-mandated services in a number of ways. Whether they mostly stay in their classroom or spend some time in the special education room, they're going to learn a bit differently than other students. Today, we'll take a look at the common service locations that help students with LDs meet educational goals.

Learning the Right Teaching Strategies

We all remember that one teacher who really made a difference in our lives. The right teaching strategies spell out the difference between a creative, engaging classroom and one that stagnates without reaching most of its students. In this lesson, we'll talk about the teaching strategies that make learning memorable for students with LDs.

Helping Students With Word Identification Problems

Word identification problems can make "cat" look like "can" or "pan." Imagine how hard it would be to read all the wrong words in all the right places. In this lesson, you'll discover smart strategies to help student find their words.

Helping Students With Reading Comprehension Problems

For students who have trouble reading, it's hard enough to just get the words right. But to pair those words with their meaning is a seemingly insurmountable task. In today's lesson, we'll go over how to chunk information so students can understand what they're reading and fall in love with texts.

Helping Students With Written Expression Problems

Writing poses quite a few challenges for students with LDs. Some of them have trouble holding their pencils, and others find it difficult to communicate what it is they're trying to say. Today, we'll take a tour of strategies that bring writing to life for students who often don't even realize all the neat things they have to say.

Helping Students With Math Reasoning and Calculation Problems

A lot of students with LDs dread math because it requires a lot of skills to come together seamlessly and at the same time: Reasoning, logic, number sense, writing, and computation are all key. But math doesn't have to be so scary. In this lesson, we'll discuss how to make all those numbers a little easier for students with LDs to manipulate.

Modifying Your Classroom

Even though the IEP gives you a general idea of how to help your students with LDs , you'll still need to explore new, innovative ideas to modify your classroom, assignments, and tests, and that's what we'll discuss in today's lesson. These modifications often spell success for students with LDs who need just a little push in the right direction.

Managing Student Behavior

We've all had days when going to school was a drag. Students with LDs are no different. Because school forces them to tackle big challenges head on, it's often their least favorite thing to do. This can lead to big behavior problems that you'll have to defuse creatively. We'll take a look at some great strategies in this lesson.

Linking Home and School

The connection between home and school is a powerful predictor of classroom success for students with LDs. So in our final lesson, we'll discuss the best ways to conduct meaningful parent-teacher conferences that help everyone unite behind a child with LDs in need.

Course 3 - Certificate in Teaching Students With Autism Online Course

Meet Your Students With Austism
You may have already taught students with high-functioning autism or Asperger's Syndrome, but have you taken the time to get to know them? Today we'll discover how their brains are wired differently, the ways they behave, and smart strategies to make the most of the opportunity to teach these kids.

Understand the Common Characteristics of HFA/AS
Now that we've met our students, in this lesson we'll develop an understanding of the characteristics they often display in our classrooms. From trouble handling change to difficulty with social interaction, language processing, and distractions, we'll discover how these characteristics shape students' worldview and ability to perform in academic settings. 

Discover How Your Students Think
Did you know that most students with high-functioning autism and Asperger's Syndrome are visual thinkers? Today we'll spend some time determining how these students process information so we can tailor our lesson plans to their preferred learning and thinking styles. 

Nurture Students' Social Skills
In this lesson, you'll discover how students with high-functioning autism and Asperger's Syndrome struggle socially. We'll talk about the extent of the problem, some of the causes, and its very real impact. Then we'll discuss some nonverbal and verbal exercises we can do in class to lessen these students' social anxiety. 

Encourage Language Reciprocity
Today we'll explore how students with high-functioning autism and Asperger's Syndrome converse and why it's so incredibly hard for them to keep conversations going. Then we'll talk about a graphic organizer that is very helpful when students need to translate between their thoughts and ours. Finally, we'll cover how to write social stories that help kids understand what's expected of them.

Work With Sensory Sensitivities
In this lesson, we're going to examine why students with high-functioning autism and Asperger's Syndrome have such delicate sensory sensitivities. Then we'll discuss two strategies for helping them reclaim control over daily experiences that once seemed quite intimidating. Both the strategies we'll discuss are visual ones, and they're wonderfully easy and effective. 

Nurture Special Interests
Students with high-functioning autism or Asperger's Syndrome are often "little professors" who have highly specialized interests and fixations. How do we direct these gifts for math or language or science into appropriate academic channels? With visual strategies that help students link their interests to the broader world. You'll learn the strategies today!

Encourage Homework Completion
This may just be your favorite lesson in the course! Every teacher I know is looking for new and exciting strategies to get students to do their homework. Today you'll learn how to engage students with high-functioning autism or Asperger's Syndrome in their studies and link their interests with meaningful learning. 

Counter Runaway Emotions and Meltdowns
What if you had an emotional meltdown every single day? Would you be excited to get out of bed and do it all over again? Probably not. Many students with high-functioning autism or Asperger's Syndrome are prone to meltdowns and tantrums that derail their focus and take up precious classroom time. In this lesson, you'll learn how to turn these charged encounters into more positive learning experiences. 

Redirect Violent Fixations
No one likes to be teased! Sadly, many students with high-functioning autism or Asperger's Syndrome are bullied or made fun of on a daily basis. Because this makes them so fearful and frustrated, they often fixate on objects of power or violence—fixations that can have very serious consequences in today's world. Today we'll delve into how to channel these frustrations into more appropriate feelings. 

Foster Attentiveness
Imagine what it would be like if your mind raced all the time, darting from thought to thought at warp speed. It would be pretty hard to pay attention to anything, wouldn't it? In this lesson, we'll look at ways to help students focus on our lessons and learn a little something in the process. Here's a hint: Visuals help! 

Plan for the Future
In our final lesson, we'll talk about smart ways to prepare students for life beyond our four walls. It's never too early to start thinking about ways to encourage students to reach their highest potential in future classes, jobs, and social roles. After all, isn't that why we chose to be teachers in the first place?

Entry requirements

Students must have basic literacy and numeracy skills.

Minimum education

Open entry. Previous schooling and academic achievements are not required for entry into this course.

Computer requirements

Students will need access to a computer and the internet. 

Minimum specifications for the computer are:

Windows:

  • Microsoft Windows XP, or later
  • Modern and up to date Browser (Internet Explorer 8 or later, Firefox, Chrome, Safari)

MAC/iOS

  • OSX/iOS 6 or later
  • Modern and up to date Browser (Firefox, Chrome, Safari)

All systems

  • Internet bandwidth of 1Mb or faster
  • Flash player or a browser with HTML5 video capabilities(Currently Internet Explorer 9, Firefox, Chrome, Safari)

Students will also need access the following applications:

Adobe Acrobat Reader

We provide a 7 Day Money Back Refund on all Courses

Now Only AU$699 Save AU$1101 (61%)
OFF RRP AU$1800
Delivery Method Online
Get Info Pack

Special Offer

 

Receive The Personal Success Training Program FREE, When You Purchase This Course - Limited Time Remaining!  (Value $600)

 

The Personal Success Training Program Helps You Stay Focused To Achieve Your Goals!
Benefits:
  • How to layout a Success Plan.
  • Get where you want to be in life.
  • How to unclutter your mind to succeed.
  • Achieve your dreams using your imagination.
  • How to have faith in yourself.
Features:
  • 12 month online access,  24/7 anywhere.
  • Complement your individual course purchase.
  • Internationally recognized by the IAOTS.
  • Thousands of positive reviews.
  • Limited Time Offer - Ends Soon.
 

Share this course

Course Summary

Course ID No.: 007ELA3CB
Delivery Mode: Online
Course Access: 6-8 Weeks Per Course
Time required: 72 hours
Assessments: Yes
Qualification: Certificate

Start Dates

This course is available to begin on the following dates

  • 16 October
  • 13 November
  • 11 December
  • 15 January

Learn More With Course Bundles

Popular Courses and Bundles

Get a FREE Career Planner